Talk:Vietglish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Vietnam (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is part of WikiProject Vietnam, an attempt to create a comprehensive, neutral, and accurate representation of Vietnam on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Linguistics / Applied Linguistics  (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Linguistics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of linguistics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Applied Linguistics Task Force.
 

Cà rem[edit]

Interesting... I never heard it called "Vinish" before.

I thought cà rem was Vietnamese for "ice cream" (usually shortened as kem), and was based on the French word "crème". In addition, hon-đa is often pronounced hôn-đa.

 – Minh Nguyễn (talk, contribs, blog) 20:50, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC)

hon đa[edit]

In what way is hon đa a borrowing from English if it comes from the Japanese Honda? I suggest it be removed from the list. chery 19:00, 24 January 2006 (UTC)

Vietnamese English? Or a moment of aberration in Wikipedia's history?[edit]

The examples "cà rem", "ga", "phôn", "á', are only a few among hundreds of words derived definitely from French during the French colonial rule in Vietnam. Not only I, a native speaker of Vietnamese, but the rest of the Vietnamese people have never called them derivations from English. Moreover, the example "á lô" by no means correct spelling and by no means a correct exclamation, it must be "a lô".

What I have to affirmed is that all examples of the so-called "Vietnamese English" are explicitly Vietnamese loan words from French, NOT a dialect of English, as Vietnamese is NOT a dialect of English.

It is incredible why such a mistake in basic knowledge of Vietnamese culture - this article, has existed for such a long time without being seriously discussed as other pages or rewritten, or deleted.

Borrowing is not code-switching[edit]

The lexical items discussed on this page are examples of loan word borrowing, not code-switching. The lead section will need to be edited to reflect this. In addition, the article currently cites no reliable sources. I am not editing the lead section at this time, because I don't know of any reliable sources documenting this language variety under any name. Cnilep (talk) 00:22, 10 July 2009 (UTC)

Seriously needs citations, proofs, etc.[edit]

This article is full of "caca de toro!" And giving 6 (count them, 6) lousy examples is far from convincing, let alone meeting any encyclopedic requirements.

Given the fact that French Indochina last for nearly 100 years in Vietnam, 3 of the examples can be explained as follows:

  • rađiô: from French "radio";
  • xì căng đan: from French "scandale", not English "scandal"; and
  • sốc: from French "choc", not necessary English "shock"

Out of the remaining 3 examples, "TV" and "tank" are French daily words as commonly used as "le weekend", "le marketing" or "Stop".

That leaves only the dubious, and still un-cited, mát/mad conjecture!!!

Time for deletion?

Nick O'Sea (talk) 03:40, 22 April 2011 (UTC)

"mat" derives from the coloquial "mat day" means short circuit in electric wiring thus used to refer crazy persons. Delete please! 27.78.72.132 (talk) 03:12, 6 June 2012 (UTC)