Talk:Pigeon pea

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Oily versus non-oily[edit]

Some toor dal are sold oily (with castor oil) and some are sold without oil. What are the purposes, benefits, and drawbacks of adding (castor) oil to toor dal? 204.210.242.157 (talk) 01:29, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

Oil was traditionally added to preserve freshness for long storage. Many modern consumers will buy toor dal in small packets and will find the un-oiled version lasts long enough. The continued popularity of the traditional oiled style is sometimes said to be a matter of consumer habit rather than necessity.
In either case, the dal should be washed thoroughly before use. If this is done correctly, there should not be much difference in taste between the two preparations. Happydemic (talk) 14:26, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

disambiguation, Pidgeon peas in The UK[edit]

I visited this article to find out about pidgeon peas that are used in traditional British recipes. I have now discovered that these are actually varieties of the field pea, Pisum Sativum Arvense. Thet are known as pidgeon peas in Britain and possibly in other European countries as in modern times they are used primarily as pidgeon food for those who race these birds.

Source:

http://adambalic.typepad.com/the_art_and_mystery_of_fo/2007/02/left_maple_peas

It would seem ppropriate to include a clarification in this article 82.39.231.56 (talk) 15:39, 18 January 2013 (UTC)

Alternative names jumbled[edit]

  1. Which of the names are used in English?
    1. Where?
  2. What language are the non-English ones?
  3. How about transliterations of those not in Latin script? DCDuring (talk) 04:31, 6 January 2014 (UTC)

Amino acids[edit]

Whoever claimed this has a significant amount of tryptophan is a danger to themselves and others. For someone who is bipolar, it is a nasty trick. You cannot make serotonin or B12 without tryptophan: Tryptophan 0.4g - Threonine 1.6g - Isoleucine 1.6g - Leucine 3.2g - Lysine 3.1g - Methionine 0.5g - Cystine 0.5g - Phenylalanine 3.8g - Tyrosine 1.1g - Valine 1.9g - Arginine 2.7g - Histidine 1.6g - Alanine 2g - Aspartic acid 4.4g - Glutamic acid 10.3g - Glycine 1.6g - Proline 2g - Serine 2.1g

For each gram of protein you eat, you should get 18 milligrams of histidine, 25 of isoleucine, methionine and cysteine, 55 of leucine, 51 of lysine, 47 of phenylalanine and tyrosine, 27 of threonine, 7 of tryptophan and 32 of valine, according to the Institute of Medicine.

If you eat 128 grams of protein each day, this amounts to a total of 2.3 grams of histidine, 3.2 of isoleucine, methionine and cysteine, 7 of leucine, 6.5 of lysine, 6 of phenylalanine and tyrosine, 3.5 of threonine, .9 of tryptophan and 4.1 of valine. http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/recommended-levels-essential-amino-acids-3649.html

nutrition comparison of mature/immature seeds[edit]

The nutrition comparison between mature/immature seed probably doesn't take into account the greater water content of the immature seed, in which case the comparison is meaningless. For the reader to have any confidence in the nutrition comparison, the chart should show the % water in each, or compare dry weights and state so. USDA needs correcting too, probably. Rtdrury (talk) 10:33, 23 March 2014 (UTC)

Common names[edit]

Toor Dal is one of the most widely consumed staple foods of India, but the name 'Pigeon pea' is entirely unknown. It is therefore essential that the names of this staple food in various vernaculars find prominent space on this page, so that people know what they are talking about. Someone removed the entire list of names a few days ago. That person clearly did not know the importance of the list of names; perhaps he thought it was a vanity list. That is not the case and I hope the importance of the list is understood. Thank you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 120.63.1.226 (talk) 06:25, 3 July 2019 (UTC)

Are you talking about the "Common Names section"? I'm not the one who removed it, and I'm not planning to, but I also don't understand why this is here, and why half of it is devoted to Indian languages. Listing all of the common English names makes sense, but no other plant page has a list of common names in so many other languages. Given that languages like Hindi have their own Wikipedias, I don't see the importance of translating it into Hindi here. Justin Kunimune (talk) 13:51, 7 July 2019 (UTC)
Actually, upon closer inspection, it seems that the WP:Plants guidelines are pretty clear on the subject: only common names in English should be listed on the English Wikipedia page. Thus, for consistency's sake, I'm re-removing the section, which I believe is extraneous as per the reasons noted above. Readers can go to the Hindi Wikipedia to see the plant's common name in Hindi, etc. Justin Kunimune (talk) 23:23, 30 July 2019 (UTC)
@120.63.25.127, please describe your reasoning for re-adding the names section here. Is "toor dal" commonly used to refer to pigeon peas in English? If not, then it's not relevant to this page, only to the Hindi page: https://hi.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E0%A4%85%E0%A4%B0%E0%A4%B9%E0%A4%B0_%E0%A4%A6%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%B2 Justin Kunimune (talk) 13:19, 3 August 2019 (UTC)

I've removed this section again. I hope the above IP editors have read WP:PLANTS#Common names and noted the emphasis placed on "used in English". Names in the removed section don't meet these guidelines. Also note the more general guidelines at WP:NOTDICTIONARY: indiscriminate lists of names or terms in other languages are not suitable content. As Justin Kunimune says, these names may be added to the respective Wikipedias of those languages, subject to their policies regarding suitable references etc. Declangi (talk) 04:01, 27 September 2019 (UTC)

In Australia, at least, split pigeon peas are commonly sold in Indian stores under the name of toor dal. (My chain supermarket has them too.) I am an Australian of European descent and have used toor dal for years, without knowing what pigeon peas are. Given how widespread Indian cuisine and Indian grocery stores are, let's at least include toor in the article. Not sure where, though (toor is now just mentioned briefly under dry method) --Chriswaterguy talk 07:20, 5 February 2020 (UTC)

Okay. If "toor" is commonly used in English, then it does deserve to be mentioned. I found [this English language source](http://www.geacindia.gov.in/resource-documents.aspx) mentioning "tur" and "read gram" as alternative vernacular names and added both to the lead with that citation. I couldn't find any source using the spelling "toor"; ideally that shouldn't be mentioned without one, but on the other hand it's just an alternate romanization of the same Hindi word, so it might be safe to have it uncited. Either way, I added a redirect from "toor" to this page ("Tur (bean)" also already redirects here).
Justin Kunimune (talk) 17:10, 5 February 2020 (UTC)

toor(Unix)[edit]

Should Toor (Unix) be added as a disambiguation? Wikitrumpets (talk) 00:51, 21 May 2020 (UTC)